.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}

Money

The www.FedPrimeRate.com Personal Finance Blog and Magazine

Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Best Egg "Pre-Approved" Loan Offer: Why Not Say "Pre-Qualified?"

Best Egg Pre-Approved Loan Offer

Best Egg Pre-Approved Loan Offer

After all these years, I can't believe that lenders are still allowed to use this language:

"Pre-Approved"

I'm old, and I've done plenty of borrowing in my time, so I know that the phrase "you're pre-approved" is a very unethical trick lenders use to make you think that your financial background has already been vetted, and your loan application is virtually guaranteed to get a green light. I know better.

But what about the young, first-time borrower with a limited or nonexistent credit history?  They see the "pre-approved" hook, they apply, they get turned down, and the lender ends up getting something very valuable: all of the rejected borrower's most sensitive, identifying information (name, address, Social Security number, age, etc.) Not good.  Not good at all.

===========

OK, so here's an explainer of a mortgage "pre–approval letter," by the good folks at TheMortgageReports.com:

"...Having a pre–approval letter gives your offer a lot more clout, because the seller has solid evidence you’re qualified for a loan to purchase the home.

Realtors generally prefer a pre–approval letter over a pre–qualification letter, because a pre–approval has been vetted to prove your eligibility.

Note: getting “pre–qualified” is different from getting a pre–approval.”

Both terms mean a lender is likely willing to loan you a certain amount of money. But Realtors generally prefer a pre–approval letter over a pre–qualification letter.

That’s because pre–qualification letters are not verified. They’re just an estimate of your budget based on a few questions.

A pre–approval letter, on the other hand, has been vetted against your credit report, bank statements, W2s, and so on. It’s an actual offer from a mortgage company to lend to you – not just an estimate.

You are NOT required to stick with the lender you use for pre–approval when you get your final mortgage. You can always choose a different lender if you find a better deal..."

And this is exactly what ALL banks should do: use the term "pre–qualified" instead of "pre-approved," and include a detailed explanation of what it means, not in tiny, eye-straining text and the end of the last page, but in bold, and right next to the first use of the term.  Amen.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


--> SITEMAP <--

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home





bing

bing

FedPrimeRate.com
Entire website copyright © 2022 FedPrimeRate.comSM


This website is neither affiliated nor associated with The United States Federal Reserve in any way.
Information in this website is provided for educational purposes only. The owners of this website
make no warranties with respect to any and all content contained within this website. Consult a
financial professional before making important decisions related to any investment or loan
product, including, but not limited to, business loans, personal loans, education loans, first
or second mortgages, credit cards, car loans or any type of insurance.